12.21.2005

It's Your Business - Take Ownership

When we enroll with a networking company it is customary and expected that there may be a learning curve. The role of the sponsor / upline should be to shorten this curve as quickly as possible. This can be achieved through one-on-one coaching, referral of appropriate training literature, and recommending a course of self-study for the new enrollee.

In the initial start-up process, the sponsor will have a hands-on approach by helping to make leads calls, conducting presentation meetings, and developing a "warm list" with the new member.

Once the sponsor has reviewed all the business materials and answered all questions or concerns, the new business owner should be well equipped to engage the activity. The sponsor should approach training with the idea of making themselves obsolete to the activities of routine business development.

I do not mean they should disappear and abandon the new recruit. I mean that the reins of the business need to be turned over to the enrollee and the conditions need to be fostered that the new person wants to establish self-reliance at the earliest possible moment.

If you are a leader, you do not need to be surrounded by people to remind you of that fact. If you are a teacher, your goal should be to properly educate and empower people to take action on what you have shared. If you are a serious business developer, one of your main goals must include assisting others in achieving their success and profitability.

You want others to take ownership of their business and by first displaying consistent activity of your commitment, you create that reasonable expectation. Do not accept the burden of building a business for someone else. You help no one, over the long haul, by assuming the responsibility of another's success or failure. If you try this, you will likely build resentment, distance yourself from what may have been strong relationships, and end up burning yourself out.

Be available to help those on your team. Be forthright and honest with what you teach. Be consistent and truthful in your activities. Be humble about any level of success you may have achieved and never, never, never believe your own press.

1 Comments:

Anonymous scott edwards said...

Hey, you have a great blog here! You really are very talented and deserve an honest compliment, congradulations! I'm definitely going to bookmark you!

I have a Home business site/blog. It successfully covers Home business related stuff.

Come and check it out if you get time, Scott.

January 22, 2006  

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